Tektites, Impactites, articles:
 
Our offer for sale Darwin glasses from Tasmania, Australia and Lybian Desert Glasses from Lybian Desert
Each piece is selected and high quality, especially recommended for collectors!
Our stocking constantly expanding and changing. Authenticity is guaranteed!

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Darwin Glasses from Tasmania, Darwin Crater, Australia:
DG#001
Darwin Glass
Individual, nice shape
Weight: 47.9 carat
25 USD
Darwin glass is a natural glass found south of Queenstown in West Coast, Tasmania. It takes its name from Mount Darwin in the West Coast Range, where it was first reported, and later gave its name to Darwin Crater, a probable impact crater, and the inferred source of the glass. Fragments of Darwin glass are found scattered over a 410 km² area. Such an area is called a strewn field. On slopes and flat ground between 250 and 500 m elevation, the glass occurs with quartzite fragments buried under peat and soil. The peat is normally around 20 cm thick, and the quartzite fragment horizon is typically 30 cm thick. On mountain peaks higher than 500 m, the bedrock is directly exposed to the air, and Darwin glass occurs occasionally on the surface. In valleys below 220 m the Darwin glass is buried below peat and sediments. The glass occurs north, west and south from the crater. Its distribution extends to Kelly Basin and the lower northeast shore of Macquarie Harbour. Northwards it extends almost to the Lyell Highway and Crotty Dam. Darwin glass is rare in the crater itself.
The glass is light to dark green, white or black. The glass takes the form of twisted masses, fragments or chunks up to 10 cm. Internally it has a flowing texture defined by lines of elliptical bubbles. There are two kinds of Darwin glass when composition is measured. Type 1 is normally white or green whereas type 2 is normally black to dark green. The dark glass contains less silica and more magnesium and iron than the light green glass. The dark glass is also enriched in chromium, nickel and cobalt. A possible explanation for the chemical differences is that, in addition to being mainly composed of melted local metamorphic rocks, the type 2 glass also contains a component of extraterrestrial material from the meteorite. Darwin glass has been dated at about 816,000 years. (Wiki)

DG#002
Darwin Glass
Individual, nice shape
Weight: 38.9 carat
22 USD
DG#003
Darwin Glass
Individual, nice shape
Weight: 36.5 carat
21 USD
DG#004
Darwin Glass
Individual, nice shape
Weight: 34.7 carat
20 USD
DG#005
Darwin Glass
Individual, nice shape
Weight: 30.9 carat
18 USD
Lybian Desert Glasses, Lybian desert:
Libyan desert glass (LDG), or great sand sea glass is a substance found in areas in the Libyan Desert. Fragments of desert glass can be found over large areas, up to tens of kilometers.
The origin of the glass is a controversial issue for the scientific community, with many evolving theories. Meteoritic origins for the glass were long suspected, and recent research linked the glass to impact features, such as zircon-breakdown, vaporized quartz and meteoritic metals, and to an impact crater. Some geologists associate the glass not with impact melt ejecta, but with radiative melting from meteoric large aerial bursts. If that were the case, the glass would be analogous to trinitite, which is created from sand exposed to the thermal radiation of a nuclear explosion. The Libyan desert glass has been dated as having formed about 26 million years ago. It was knapped and used to make tools during the Pleistocene. (Wiki)

LDG#001
Lybian Desert Glass
Individual, nice translucent
Weight: 50.9 carat
25 USD
LDG#001
Lybian Desert Glass
Individual, nice translucent
Weight: 50.9 carat
25 USD
Type: Tektite; Zhamanshinite  very rare and valuable tektite type
Location: Irgiz River, Zhamanschin, Kazakhstan
Irgizites (occasionally spelled Irghizite) are found are found at the 13.5 km-wide Zhamanshin crater. They contain coesite, stishovite, maskelynite and melted foamed silica. The Zhamanshin crater is estimated to have formed approximately 900,000 years ago.
The elements nickel, cobalt and chromium are found in Irgizites at levels significantly higher than local geological material, which, along with their shapes and internal structure, leads to the conclusion they were formed due to impact. As with all tektites, Irgizites have a very low water content; thus called "dry glasses." Most Irgizites appear like broken strips of melted glass flow. (MESIALonl.)

Irgizhite tektites from Kazakhstan
Type: Tektite; Moldavite  very nice and valuable tektite type
Location: Czech Republic, Bohemia, Moldavia,
Moldavite (Czech: Vltavín) is an olive-green or dull greenish vitreous substance possibly formed by a meteorite impact. It is one kind of tektite. They were introduced to the scientific public for the first time in 1786 as “chrysolites” from Týn nad Vltavou in a lecture by professor Josef Mayer of Prague University, read at a meeting of the Bohemian Scientific Society (Mayer 1788). Zippe (1836) first used the term “moldavite” derived from the town of Moldauthein (Czech: Týn nad Vltavou) in Bohemia (the Czech Republic), from where the first described pieces came from.
Moldavite's bottle-green glass colour led to its being commonly called Bouteillen-stein, and at one time it was regarded as an artificial product, but this view is opposed to the fact that no remains of glassworks are found in the neighbourhood of its occurrence; moreover, pieces of the substance are widely distributed in Middle to Upper Miocene and younger fluvial clays and gravelly sands in Bohemia and Moravia.
In 1900, F. E. Suess pointed out that the gravel-size moldavites exhibited curious pittings and wrinkles on the surface, which could not be due to the action of water, but resembled the characteristic markings on many meteorites. Boldly attributing the material to a cosmic origin, he regarded moldavites as a special type of meteorite for which he proposed the name of tektite. However, for a long time, it was generally believed to be a variety of obsidian. Because of their difficult fusibility, extremely low water content, and its chemical composition, the current overwhelming consensus among earth scientists is that moldavites were formed 15 million years ago during the impact of a giant meteorite in present-day Nördlinger Ries. Splatters of material that was melted by the impact cooled while they were actually airborne and most fell in central Bohemia-traversed by Vltava river (German: Moldau). Currently, moldavites have been found in area that includes southern Bohemia, western Moravia, the Cheb Basin (northwest Bohemia), Lusatia (Germany), and Waldviertel (Austria). (Wiki)

Moldavites from Besednice, Czech Republic
2.5 USD/carat
0.5 USD/carat
Eastern-Asia Tektites:
The Australasian strewnfield, covering at least one-tenth of the Earth's surface, is the largest and the youngest of the tektite strewnfields. The 800,000 year-old strewnfield includes most of Southeast Asia (Vietnam, Thailand, Southern China, Laos and Cambodia). The material from the impact stretches across the ocean to include the islands of the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia and Java and reaches far out into the Indian Ocean and south to the western side of Australia.

The impact crater may have been between 32 and 114 kilometres in diameter. Also, some recent estimates suggest that the strewn field may cover 30% of the Earth's surface (Povenmire et al.). (Wiki)

T#01 02 03 04 05
Eastern-Asia Tektites
Dumbell and tear-drop shapes
12 USD/piece
T#06 07 08 09
Eastern-Asia Tektites
Dumbell and tear-drop shapes
10 USD/piece
SOLD
Australites, AUSTRALIA